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BadBlock, Cerber, Chimera, CoinVault, Crypt0L0cker, CryptoJoker, CTB-Locker, Jigsaw, KeRanger, Locky, NanoLocker, Petya, Samas, TeslaCrypt, zCrypt… these are just a few out of the hundreds of ransomware cropping up in the past year.

A few years ago, the ransomware threat was something that you heard an individual or two talking about, you may even have seen it dramatized on TV (remember that episode on The Good Wife?). But the past couple of years have shown an explosion.

If in 2013, the criminals behind CryptoLocker were earning “as low as” $3M, then in 2015 they were already earning purportedly $30M.

In the past couple of years, we have seen ransomware growing from a nickel & dime operation targeting individual computers to a multimillion-dollar criminal operation targeting organizations that can afford to pay enterprise-level payments.

The real hit though is to the business’ operations. When ransomware hits an organization, the employees are blocked from accessing their files, including files needed to perform their job.  Just ask those Sony employees who walked into their offices in the morning to find that they were locked out of their computers and their screen displaying a note ridiculing their efforts; the employees at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital, Kentucky-based Methodist Hospital and the handful of other healthcare providers that were forced to go back to pen and paper, until their files were recovered.

Ransomware is a growing concern to enterprises on all levels. Ransomware has become a discussion topic in the boardroom. Management is concerned about how ransomware will affect operational cost where their technological advancement will be halted, and productivity hindered due to inaccessible computing. In today’s world every minute – and even second, can be costly.

Yet, with all the concern and buzz of ransomware, there was not a single go-to-place for that high-level discussion talking about the threat and cost to the business, the latest trends and even factoids. It’s for this reason we’ve launched today the website http://ransomwareprevention.com/.

We have created a go-to website with various Q&As concerning ransomware, from an encryption primer to targeted industries. The site includes knowledge facts and allows for a simple keeping up-to-date with trends to help with that boardroom discussion. As an anecdotal piece different ransomware notes can be found there for reference. And as its name suggests, the site also discusses ransomware prevention.

We welcome all that are concerned with ransomware to check out the site, take the time to review and feel free to share with your peers and boardroom. If there is any question that was not addressed, please don’t hesitate to add to our ransomware discussion and feel free to share any comments or questions in our comment section at the bottom of this post. We’ll make sure add any relevant comments/questions to the site.

ransomwareprevention.com